Workshop Descriptions

Wednesday May 17th, 9-10:20 AM

Wednesday May 17th, 1-2:20 PM

Thursday May 18, Afternoon

1A. Fundamentals of Music Theory: Blending for Fluency and Interdisciplinary Learning, Christoper White, Luke Phelan

Music, as one wag put it, is the food of love. While the praises of music theory are sung less sumptuously (if sung at all), before the feast is the cookbook. In this workshop we will showcase a suite of on-line tools for blending an introductory music theory course, a course designed to teach non-musicians the basic ingredients and techniques that underpin musical preparations in the Western-European musical tradition. These tools were developed with the goals of helping students achieve mastery of basic skills more quickly in order to create more time in the course for understanding the historical and cultural contexts in which these tools operate. That is, tasks best learned through autodidactic practice and repetition were transferred outside of class time, making room for topics that lend themselves to critical argumentation and in-person discussion. Participants in this workshop will be treated to a microcosm of the class, divided into several courses: a mini-lesson on some musical skills precedes a live demo of the course’s site, then the session is turned over to practice, experiment, and discussion (participants will find it useful to have a laptop or tablet). For dessert, we present paired quantitative and qualitative approaches to assessing student learning and project success, and preview future developments we are planning based on the experience so far. Play on!

1B. Planning, Producing, and Evaluating Instructional Video, Dann Hurlbert, Susan Manning

Video use is growing dramatically in higher education for lots of reasons. You can instruct, evaluate, critique, report, blend, flip with it. You can also flop with it. This session will feature Carleton College’s Dann Hurlbert (in person) and Credly’s and the University of Wisconsin-Stout’s Dr. Susan Manning (streamed live) as they discuss when and how to us video successfully.

If your goal is to use video better for either online instruction or blended learning, this session may be for you. Dr. Manning will give practical examples of how she uses video to instruct and connect with her students through online UWStout education courses. Dann will outline pedagogical uses for various video types, and he’ll provide tips and tricks for creating good instructional videos in the Arts, Languages, Humanities, Sciences, Mathematics, and much more.

We’ll look at tools that work for quick screencasts and modest “studio-style” productions. After this presentation, faculty & staff will be able to plan for, create, and evaluate results from their own instructional videos. As with any good presentation, there will also be helpful handouts, healthy discussion, and some hands-on tech to try.

For a quick tour of some recent videos Dann has developed for both blended and online instruction, click here.

1C. The hypothes.is shared annotation tool: A hands-on workshop with an eye toward Intergroup Dialogue (IGD) or integrative learning, Tim Clarke, Jenna Azar

Over the past year, members of the Digital Learning Team at Muhlenberg College have incorporated the hypothes.is (https://hypothes.is/about/ ) web-based, shared annotation tool into several learning contexts. This workshop intends to demonstrate use of the hypothes.is tool and provide ample time for hands-on, directed exploration of the tool’s capabilities and affordances. Additionally, this workshop hopes to initiate a conversation that explores pedagogical advantages of shared annotation within particular liberal arts learning scenarios. Specifically, we will discuss our experiences using hypothes.is within an Intergroup Dialogue (IGD) course, two faculty learning communities, and a digital peer learning training program.

During this 70-75 minute workshop, participants will have an opportunity to install hypothes.is on personal laptops or tablets (or on classroom equipment). Additionally, participants will explore the use of public and private hypothes.is groups for shared annotation of web-based texts. The hypothes.is tool is quick to install and easy to learn. But the power of shared annotation atop course texts is best considered in action. Workshop facilitators will guide participants through tested techniques known to be engaging and effective for learners ranging from first year undergraduates to faculty. In addition to group exploration of hypothes.is software, the workshop will push beyond the more obvious classroom applications for shared annotation, and will facilitate discussion of integrative pedagogic scenarios. Workshop participants will engage around broader ideas of how hypothes.is might enhance their teaching and learning scenarios or meet their particular goals. Specific attention will be paid to the use of hypothes.is as a means to work beyond the silos of the Learning Management System, and especially across learning contexts that pose temporal (e.g., “cluster” courses), geographic (e.g., service learning, study abroad), or similar challenges to the liberal arts. Attendees will need laptops or workstations for this workshop.

2A. Creating an Accessible Video Presentation, Lei Song

A multi-media presentation is a popular teaching tool among faculty, and an effective assessment method for students to demonstrate their learning individually, or as a collaborative project. With the increasing popularity of a blended format of face-to-face and online learning in college courses, some faculty may record a voice-over-slides lecture to illustrate important concepts, ideas, and solutions, and students are often expected to deliver a multimedia presentation in a face-to-face or a video format. As web accessibility and the accessibility of other electronic resources has become a concern for many institutions, it is not only about the faculty who need to provide accessible content, but also about students who may create and share content with their peers. The advocacy for a more accessible learning environment requires a community of learners’ awareness and active participation using the best practices. In this hands-on workshop, the presenter will discuss the accessibility issues with different presentation formats, and the guidelines for an accessible presentation. The participants will be able to practice the following skills:

  • Check for accessibility of a presentation format
  • Create a voice-over-slides video presentation
  • Ensure video accessibility by captioning

The participants will also be provided with a sample guideline for student use, and discuss the possible course design strategies and accessibility accommodations related to multimedia course content and assessments.

In order to engage to the full extent of the above hands-on tasks, the attendees will need to have a laptop with a built-in web camera and a microphone, for the purpose of sample recording. Also, the participants will need to have a Google/YouTube Account to practice with the free captioning tool.

2B. Crafting Digital Narratives with Scalar, Alicia Peaker

From non-linear storytelling to rich, scholarly annotations, this workshop will encourage new ways of thinking about classroom writing in digital environments. Using a web application called Scalar, you will begin to craft a media-rich digital narrative. Scalar is a free, open source authoring and publishing platform that’s designed to make it easy for authors to assemble media from multiple sources and juxtapose them with their own writing in a variety of ways. Attendees will need laptops and a non-Internet Explorer Web Browser in order to participate in this workshop.

2C. Reading Photography, Karen Koehler, Jocelyn Edens

Our Blended Learning course, “Reading Photography” focuses on select photographs, both canonical and non-canonical, from the earliest daguerreotypes to the expanding global image ecologies of the present. We study the social, intellectual, and art histories of photography, interrogating concepts of visual representation and issues of technology, identity, and power, while employing the theoretical lenses of writers such as Benjamin, Kracauer, Diawara, Sebald, and Moten.

A team of faculty and staff designed online course modules on Scalar, organized around the photographs, in order to allow for a a slow teaching approach. The digital modules were designed to increase student engagement, enhance opportunities for collaboration, and deepen the knowledge-base and resources that students will draw on for their assessed work. Our design for this course was based upon the idea of “slow teaching”—a pedagogical orientation that recognizes the challenges and distractions of our plugged in world, and the potential risks for too much dispersal of ideas and actions when teaching in a reactive way with technologies. Simultaneously, our approach responds to changes in the way that we are interpreting and using photographs, in digital formats and in digital environments. The critical reading of photographs using slow teaching is premised on the recognition that not only photographs, but our methods of engaging with, looking at, reading, citing, and collecting them are changing in ways that have not been adequately integrated into the pedagogical environment. We are engaging with less material rather than more and digging deeper and with more analytical heft. The premise of our course is not anti-technology. It is that a blended approach can enable close looking and close reading when teaching about photography and that it can promote an advanced understanding of research methodologies.

We are proposing to engage the Bryn Mawr audience in a slow looking exercise, followed by discussion and an outline of our use of Scalar and Moodle as research and assignment sites, respectively. We will discuss our successes and challenges, while outlining the way in which rigorous research can be matched with free writing and experimental methods.

2C: It Takes a Village: Creating Online Assignments for Civil Justice, Anne Marchant

In the wake of dramatically shifting political and social realities, there have been active discussions in faculty forums and at conference on ways to help students become more adept at navigating complex social and political issues. This workshop will take these ideas to the next level by giving faculty an opportunity to apply these ideas to their own online classes. We will begin by describing a grass-roots approach to promoting a culture of intercultural understanding at Shenandoah University in which an ad hoc group of staff and faculty came together to offer (both face to face and online) workshops to the campus community. This has led to a paradigm shift in the way the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Technology describes online learning activities for individual, cooperative, and collaborative student work when doing faculty development. While the immediate goal is for students to appreciate how identity shapes our learning and decision-making processes, we expect beneficial “side effects” that will help students develop skills and strategies to avoid polarizing issues, to find common ground, to avoid “group think,” and to make fact-based decisions. This 80 minute workshop will first describe our navigating intercultural workshops and then offer a toolkit of ideas for online activities and easy to use technologies to support intercultural understanding that may be applied broadly across the humanities and social sciences. Participants will be asked to bring assignments from their classes that might be adapted. We will then spend time working on these assignments in small online groups and then share and assess ideas.

2D. Reading Photography, Karen Koehler, Jocelyn Edens

Our Blended Learning course, “Reading Photography” focuses on select photographs, both canonical and non-canonical, from the earliest daguerreotypes to the expanding global image ecologies of the present. We study the social, intellectual, and art histories of photography, interrogating concepts of visual representation and issues of technology, identity, and power, while employing the theoretical lenses of writers such as Benjamin, Kracauer, Diawara, Sebald, and Moten.

A team of faculty and staff designed online course modules on Scalar, organized around the photographs, in order to allow for a a slow teaching approach. The digital modules were designed to increase student engagement, enhance opportunities for collaboration, and deepen the knowledge-base and resources that students will draw on for their assessed work. Our design for this course was based upon the idea of “slow teaching”—a pedagogical orientation that recognizes the challenges and distractions of our plugged in world, and the potential risks for too much dispersal of ideas and actions when teaching in a reactive way with technologies. Simultaneously, our approach responds to changes in the way that we are interpreting and using photographs, in digital formats and in digital environments. The critical reading of photographs using slow teaching is premised on the recognition that not only photographs, but our methods of engaging with, looking at, reading, citing, and collecting them are changing in ways that have not been adequately integrated into the pedagogical environment. We are engaging with less material rather than more and digging deeper and with more analytical heft. The premise of our course is not anti-technology. It is that a blended approach can enable close looking and close reading when teaching about photography and that it can promote an advanced understanding of research methodologies.

We are proposing to engage the Bryn Mawr audience in a slow looking exercise, followed by discussion and an outline of our use of Scalar and moodle as research and assignment sites, respectively. We will discuss our successes and challenges, while outlining the way in which rigorous research can be matched with free writing and experimental methods.

Using the Jupyter Notebook for Education

This workshop is affiliated with the Jupyter Day: Transformative Teaching with the Jupyter Notebook conference, which will be held at Bryn Mawr College on May 19. For more information on Jupyter notebooks, that conference and the workshop see jupyterday.blogs.brynmawr.edu.

Blended Learning through Blended Reality, Linda Bush, Palak Bhandari

Take a fieldtrip to ancient, dangerous, or unearthly places without leaving your campus?

Learn the details of human anatomy by dissecting a cadaver you never physically touch?

Guide a research student through a tricky experiment while you’re away at a conference?

Augmented reality and virtual reality (AR/VR) make all this possible!

Devices and content for AR/VR are on the cusp of becoming widely available and affordable for educational as well as personal use. Exciting and stimulating possibilities abound. This workshop will include the following:

1) demonstration of the Microsoft HoloLens mixed-reality device

2) discussion and exploration of new apps being designed, developed and tested to enhance education and learning, including Pearson’s HoloCastle, HoloAnatomy, and HoloChemistry

3) opportunity for hands-on experience of mixed-reality

4) open discussion of ways to add AR/VR and holographic explorations to courses and learning experiences in your discipline

This will be engaging for anyone already working with 3D holographic assets or considering working with mixed-reality technologies to increase learning opportunities.

 

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